2009
 

‘For Humankind’, Koraalberg Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium

10/09/09 – 17/10/09

Solo exhibition

www.koraalberg.be

 

Hall des Machines (Exposition International de Bruxelles, 1897) vs. Rise of the Machines (The Terminator, 1984)

duratrans on acrylic, lightbox
100 x 125 cm
2009

 

‘Images Recalled – Bilder auf abruf’
3rd Photofestival Kunsthalle Mannheim, Ludwigshafen, Heidelberg, Germany

5/09/09 – 25/10/09

Groupexhibition with:

Luchezar Boyadjiev, Candice Breitz, Olaf Breuning, Paolo Chiasera, Anetta Mona Chisa & Lucia Tkacova, Lenka Clayton, Marjolijn Dijkman, Harm van den Dorpel, Elmgreen & Dragset, Amel Emric, Leo Fabrizio, Cyprien Gaillard, Pablo Hare, Joel Holmberg, William Hundley, Iman Issa, Mandy Lee Jandrell, Jan Kempenaers, Miguel Luciano, Ives Maes, Kelly Mark, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Lauris Paulus, Sarah Pickering, Pascual Sisto, Mohammed Tawfeeq, Guy Tillim, The Bruce High Quality Foundation, Rijel Violet, Qingsong Wang

www.fotofestival.info

 

Pabellon del Futuro (Exposicion Universal de Sevilla, 1992) vs. Robert Neville (The Omega Man, 1971)

duratrans on acrylic, lightbox
100 x 125 cm
2009

 

‘Colossal: Art-Fact-Fiction’, Landschaftsverband Osnabrücker land, Osnabrück, Germany

25/04/09 - 2012

Curator: Jan Hoet

Group exhibition with:

Massimo Bartolini, Katinka Bock, Monica Bonvincini, Bazon Brock, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Rui Chafes, Wim Delvoye, Fabrice Gygi, Anna Lange, Ives Maes, Slava Nakoska, Dennis Oppenheim, Anette Rose, Fernando Sanchez Castillo, Andreas Slominski, Suzanne Tunn, Yue Minjun

www.colossal.de.com
 

Hazard Marking System II

Enamel, steel
60 x 60 cm
2009

The ‘Hazard Marking System’ is a universal warning sign for mines, but then altered with the word ‘biodegradable’. By adapting the warning signs for this project – redesigning the form of the signs to the German version used during World War II and switching the lettering into German - Ives Maes strongly increases the symbolic power of the signs. Planted in the grounds of the former Teutoburg Forest, the founding territory of the German national identity, the signs could appear like subversive memorials cast in the heroic mould. In that specific context the signs could act as a reminiscence of the demining of the German land from foreign oppression. On the other hand, placed in a country like Germany which is constantly questioning its own identity, the black variant of the signs will undoubtedly provoke thoughts about World War II. In that context the signs might refer more to the German land being gradually liberated from the reminiscences of those black pages having undermined the German identity for decades. Balancing between both sides, like medals showing both glorious and dark sides, Ives Maes plays strongly with the illusive irony of his work. 

(Excerpt from the text ‘Hazard Marking System’ by Beatrijs Eemans published in the exhibition catalogue ‘Colossal’)

 

‘Open Space’, Art Cologne, Köln, Germany

22/04/09 – 26/04/09

Curator: Vasif Kortun, Stefanie Kreuzer, Beatrix Ruf

Group exhibition / solo presentations with:

Julia Bünnagel, Cath Campbell, Cieslik und Schenk, Kevin Cosgrove, Alexander Dashevskiy, Lucile Desarmory, Marte Eknaes, Cevdet Erdek, Eric Eley, Kirsten Everberg, Olivier Garbay, Federico Geller, Joanne Greenbaum, Trixi Groiss, Maria Hahnenkamp, Lone Haugaard Madsen, Diango Hernandez, Chris Hipkiss, Sanja Ivekovic, Schirin Kretschmann, Andreas Lorenschat, Constantin Luser, Ives Maes, Babette Mangolte, Lin May, Jenny Michel, Melik Ohanian, Anna Parkina Coma, Mark Pearson, Bruno Peinado, Katrin Plavcak, Blake Rayne, Claus Richter, Pietro Sanguineti, Bojan Sarcevic, Hannes Schmid, Nora Schultz, Joe Sola, Martin Soto Climent, Jürgen Stollhans, Mariusz Tarkawian, Rob Thom, Mark Thompson, Simon Thompson, Tris Vonna-Michel

www.artcologne.com

 

Plans for the Future (Universal Exhibition Hannover, 2000) vs. Propaganda (Soylent Green, 1973)

duratrans on acrylic, lightbox
100 x 125 cm
2008

 

‘Drawings’, Koraalberg Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium

20/03/09 – 18/04/09

Solo exhibition

www.koraalberg.be

 

The Museum of Fine Arts and the site of the Colonial Congolese Village (Exposition International d’Anvers, 1894) vs. The 1st Historical Colonial Operation (Star Trek: The Series, 1966)

Print, pencil, gouache on paper
70 x 100 cm

Oscar Niemeyer (Interbau Berlin, 1957) vs. Raumpatrouille (Raumschiff Orion, 1966)
Print, pencil, gouache on paper
50 x 62,5 cm

 

‘Die Stadt von Morgen’, Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, Germany

15/01/09 – 01/02/09

Solo exhibition

www.bethanien.de

 

Atomium (Expo ’58: Evaluation of the world for a more humane world, 1958) vs. Klaatu (The Day the Earth stood still, 1951)

Duratrans on acrylic, lightbox
150 x 187,5 cm
2008

A messenger from a far, intelligent World from the film The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951) is visiting the, in 2008 for the 50th anniversary freshly restored, silvery radiant Atomium. The author from this photo from Klaatu in front of the Atomium is Ives Maes. He feels at home where there are remains from Science Fiction to be found. Places with a futuristic past incite the artist to a search for what is left from those dreams. That goes especially for cities that, since 1851, hosted World Expos and have built dreamy futures. The future changes rapidly. With that, progress and optimism dominates the manifestations of all World Expos, while in the world of Science Fiction the future is looked upon most critically and dark.
Ives Maes compares these different designs of the future. In his photographs he makes known characters of SF-films visit the remains of the futuristic visions that had been built with grand luxury: sometimes prestigious monuments, sometimes overgrown ruins. For us remains the big question, how to go ahead without the promise of the modern, into history, before and after the images of Ives Maes.

(Excerpt from the text ‘The Future from Yesterday can only become Contemporary as History’ by Hajo Schiff, published for BE-Magazine, Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin)

 
2008
 

‘The Great Exhibition’, Z33, Hasselt, Belgium

26/10/08 – 04/01/09

Curator: Jan Boelen

Solo exhibition

www.z33.be

 

Hyde Park (The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nations, 1851) vs. The Fireman (Fahrenheit 451, 1966)
Duratrans on acrylic, lightbox
100 x 125 cm
2008

‘The Great Exhibition’ is Ives Maes’ first major solo exhibition. Based on a series of photos, the artist sketches a controversial portrait of an era by linking elements from science fiction films to the locations and remains of previous world exhibitions. The exhibition is appropriately subtitled “Former world exhibition sites (and artefacts) visited by extra-terrestrials”. The world exhibition has always been an example of optimism, of a belief in progress through technology and science to make the world a better place. Science fiction has always been a critical metaphor for the failings of a more humane world. It predicted totalitarian regimes and nuclear holocausts due to the progress of technology and science. By placing this criticism in the presence of the optimism of the world exhibition, you get an ironic analysis of recent history. This new series of photos forms the basis of the exhibition in Z33. Ives Maes travelled throughout Europe taking pictures near existing world exhibition sites with the aid of models and props. From the first world exhibition of 1851 in London, ‘The Great Exhibition of All Nations’ to the exhibition of 2008 in Zaragosa, Spain.

 
 
 

‘The Premises’, CBZD, Leuven, Belgium
2008

Commissioned work

Ives Maes & Peter Verhelst

The work is based on a painting by Pieter Pourbus, “Plan for Dune Abbey” from 1580. On this painting appear several futuristic constructions that seem to be buildings. The utterly strange science fiction shapes are in fact scale enlargements of the material used for building the abbey. An enlarged brick, and enlarged tile, etc. A scale is added on the painting to measure the real dimensions of the materials used and to determine the size of the building. Under every object a text explains its function. In “The Premises” we used the same principle for the new building of the Flemish Community. All the materials used to make the new building are enlarged in scale and placed in the garden. Wood, bricks, tiles, water drain, etc. Peter Verhelst has written the comparative texts. The object was then photographed in the same perspective as Pieter Pourbus painted the abbey. The photograph and a reproduction of the painting are hanging in the entrance hall.

 

‘Recyclable Refugee Camp’, MER. Paper Kunsthalle vzw, Ghent, Belgium

ISBN 978-90-76979-59-5, 2008

Texts by Dieter Roelstraete, Monika Szewczyk, Philippe Vancauteren

www.merpaperkunsthalle.org

 

Recyclable Refugee Camp
Offset print, 25.5 x 19.5 cm, 
Edition of 1000
2008

This book is an overview of the complete Recyclable Refugee Camp project. It showcases most of the sculptures, installations, photo’s, video’s, websites and drawings made and exhibited between the start of the project, January 2004 and the end, January 2008.

 
2007
 

‘Tourism’, MuHKA, Antwerp, Belgium
28/10/07 – 06/01/08

Curator: Dieter Roelstraete

Solo exhibition

www.muhka.be
www.r-r-c.org/tourism

 

One week: shelter
(3x) 45 x 80 x 200 cm
Video projection, retro-projection screen, cardboard
2007

Tourism confronts the average culture consumer, burdened with all sorts of guilt feelings, with at least two ironic side effects of the globalisation as political horizon of Maes’ project: on the one hand a hard to avoid feeling that the contemporary art tourism organized around biennial economics often looks like an ennobled kind of disaster tourism. And on the other hand the painful association of the refugee with the Deleuzian concept of ‘nomadology’ as a popular intellectual metaphor for this condition of globalisation.
On the website www.r-r-c.org the trip to the refugee camp of your dreams can be booked. Who accepts the challenge has already deserved a place in the art history books: he or she has imbued the logic of relational aesthetics – one of the most dominant art movements of the last decennium, that often displayed an astonishing naïve believe in the politically transformative powers of art – until it’s ultimate, radical conclusion.

(Excerpt from the text ‘Lonely at the top#5’ by Dieter Roelstraete, 2007)

 

‘Emergency Biennale’, Stop 9: Istanbul Biennale, Istanbul, Turkey

04/09/07 – 06/11/07

Curator: Evelyne Jouanno

Group exhibition with:

Adel Abdessemed, A Constructed World, Dennis Adams, Al Fadhil, Maria-Thereza Alves, Francis Alÿs, Sylvie Blocher, Mark Boswell & Anton Kozlov, Santiago Caicedo, Cao Fei, Jota Castro, Banu Cennetoglu,Raimond Chaves, Paolo Chiasera, Hubert Czerepok, Allan De Souza, Marta Deskur, Jimmie Durham, Seamus Farrell, Alfredo Jaar, Neeme Külm, Gabriel Kuri, Ken Lum, Juan Pablo Macias, Ives Maes, Gilda Mantilla, Ahmet Ögüt, Jüri Ojaver, Lucy Orta, Damián Ortega, Gionata Gesi Ozmo, Adrian Paci, Römer + Römer, Julian Rosefeldt, Gatis Rozenfelds, Shen Yuan, Nedko Solakov, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Bert Theis, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Urban Subjects, Anton Vidokle, Cesare Viel, Luca Vitone, Hans Winkler, Sislej Xhafa, Yan Lei, Yang Fudong, Yang Jie Chang, Zheng Guogu, Zhu Jia, Aiva Zurina, etc.

www.emergency-biennale.org

 

Hazard Marking System
Edition of 50
Enamel
60 x 40 cm
2006

 

‘Tourism’, 03one, Belgrade, Serbia

13/08/07 – 18/08/07

Curator: Marko Stamenkovic

Solo exhibition

www.o3.co.yu
www.r-r-c.org/tourism

 

One hour: latrine
DVD
2007

One day: multifunctional tent          
DVD
2007

One week: shelter
DVD
2007

 

‘Commitment’, bkSM / De Garage, Mechelen, Belgium
23/02/07 – 01/04/07

Curator: Luk Lambrecht, Koen Leemans

Group exhibition with:

Francis Alÿs, Carl André, AVL, Ricardo Brey, Marcel Broodthaers, Daniel Buren, Edith Dekyndt, Geert de Mot, Simona Denicolai & Ivo Provoost, Jimmie Durham, Carlos Garalcoa, Hans Haacke, Martin Kippenberger, John Knight, Ives Maes, Adrian Paci, Anri Sala, Thomas Schütte, Pascale Martine Tayou, Mario Garcia Torres, Sisley Xhafa

www.cultuurcentrummechelen.be

 

‘Radical Democracy’

Poll result sheet, print on plastic
21 x 29,7 cm

Statue proposal, ceramic clay
30 x 30 cm
2007

Radical Democracy is an artwork that is made according to popular demand by means of a plebiscite. With a target area or group in mind the artist sets out to ask the public what it wants to see. This happens by means of five questions: What public sculpture would you like to see here, what material should it be, which size should it have, what color should it have and which title would you give it? The highest common factor inspires the artist, while the color is proportionally mixed into a certain grey. The result is a sociological study of the ideal image of a certain area in the world. But also an ironic and critical outcome of what the people want and what they will get.

 

‘Roofing’, Koraalberg Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium
25/01/07 – 10/03/07

Solo exhibition

www.koraalberg.be

 
Shingle

Resin, hemp, pigment
200 x 100 x 8 cm 
2008

In this exhibition RRC functions as a firm that develops products and offers them for sale as it is the case in any casual store. All by all, the works that are shown in Roofing appear to belong to a shop for Minimal Art. Out of the formal aspect of curved, colorful rectangles appears a sort of one-person shelter for protection against all weather conditions. Precisely what Penthouse, the title of the work, etymologically means. In this ironic and irritating exchange between severe artistic formalism and practical functionality, ROOFING, a larger shelter that can provide protection to a complete body, refers to the Painted Planks of John McCracken, while the Shelters remember us of the Single Stacks by Donald Judd.
The RRC Store presupposes a gallery space to function. It does not only question the given subject of the white cube, but it also moves about in the tension field between socially engaged art and commercial practices. The potential of different connections and coherences within the work is very high which makes it readable on different levels. This group of works unites an ironic context and the most minimal form of expression with a complex engagement to highly actual political and social thematics.

(Excerpt from the text ‘Protect me’ by Stefanie Kreuzer)

 
2006
 

‘Simon’, Brigitte Weiss Galerie, Zürich, Switzerland
20/10/06 – 16/12/06

Solo exhibition

www.likeyou.com/brigitteweiss

 

Super SIMON anti-personnel landmines
Edition of 7

Resin, hemp, pigment, poppy seeds
25,5 x 5 cm
2006

 

‘After Cage, 24 Collections in Motion’, Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst, Aachen, Germany
24/09/06 – 26/11/06

Curator: Melanie Bono

Group exhibition with:

Edgar Arceneaux, Mark Dion, Olafur Eliasson, Pieterjan Ginckels, Frank Hesse, Ives Maes, Ingrid Mwangi, Maria Roosen, Klaus Weber, Pablo Zuleta Zahr, Christof Zwiener

www.aftercage.com

 

P.R.I.V.A.C.Y.

Cardboard, paint
(100x) 158 x 118 x 3,5 cm
2006

Ives Maes presents a further part of the Recyclable Refugee Camp project, entitled P.R.I.V.A.C.Y. at the Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst. His point of departure here was the realisation that in Europe the emergence of spontaneous refugee camps can be observed, above all, in churches, where people flee in fear of deportation as a result of the strict European asylum laws. In order to guarantee these people the right to privacy laid down in article 12 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and in the spirit of aspirations he laid down himself, Maes has developed a simple insert-system consisting of punched cardboard elements which are cheap to produce and transport and are recyclable. They thus enable refugees to easily construct private living spaces in keeping with the size of their family and at the available place. P.R.I.V.A.C.Y. at the Ludwig forum is just one possibility among many. Maes also integrates the sculpture The couple,1978 by the artist John de Andrea (*1941) from the Ludwig collection into his installation.

(Excerpt from the text ‘P.R.I.V.A.C.Y.’ by Melanie Bono, published in ‘After Cage, 24 collections in motion’, DuMont Literatur und Kunst Verlag, 2007)

 

‘Jahresgaben’, Neuer Aachner Kunstverein, Aachen, Germany
20/07/06 – 31/08/06

Curator: Stefanie Kreuzer

Groupshow with:

Nairy Baghramian, Daniele Cudini, Jochem Hendriks, Ives Maes, Thomas Mohren, Astrid Nippoldt, Manuel Ocampo, David Ostrowski, Thomas Ruff, Martina Sauter, Albrecht Schäfer, Sebastian Stumpf, Johannes Wohnseifer

www.neueraachenerkunstverein.de

 

Hazard Marking System
edition of 20

enamel, steel, 220 x 45 cm
2006

 

‘The Greenery Line’, SMAK, Ghent, Belgium
08/04/06 – 04/06/06

Curator: Philippe Vancauteren

Solo exhibition

www.smak.be

 

Hazard Marking System
Enamel, steel
220 x 45 cm
2006

In recent years Ives Maes work has centered on his Recyclable Refugee Camp project, an ironic attempt to create an absolutely ethically correct work of art. Ives Maes tries to formulate a tangible response to the hyper-ethical tendency in the art world.  He extends this tactic of exaggeration as he enters the controversy over anti-personnel mines.
In response to this issue, Ives Maes devised a biodegradable landmine: the SIMON anti-personnel landmine, which casing and entire mechanism is made of organic polyesters that dissolve after a certain period of time. They could be called ‘human-friendly’ weapons, since they protect civilians against the psychological effects of prolonged fear. Mine clearance would become a thing of the past. The money saved could be used for development aid.

(Excerpt from the text ‘SIMON anti-personnel mines’ by Beatrijs Eemans, 2006)

 

Adjustments and Errors, Bag Factory, Johannesburg, South Africa
22/03/06 – 26/04/06

Group exhibition with:

Paul Hendrikse, Ives Maes, Derek Mawudoku

www.bagfactoryart.org.za

 

One day: Multifunctional tent

(5x) 45 x 80 x 200 cm, Video projection 4’18”, retro-projection screen, cardboard, 2006

‘One day: multifunctional tent’ is a video about a biodegradable garden shed that is used as a multifunctional storage unit. In this case it is used for an all night barbeque. The video is presented in a cardboard box and is a compilation of video stills. It was recorded and exhibited in Johannesburg. It is part of a trilogy respectively named ‘One hour: latrine’,  ‘One day: Multifunctional tent ‘ and ‘One week: shelter’. The trilogy is part of the ‘Tourism’ project.

 
2005
 

‘Frontera, a proposal for a futuristic society’, Frontera, Mexico
10/02/2006 - 2007

Curator: Laboratorio 060

Groupshow with:

Nestor Batres, Carlos Bunga, Gilberto Esparza, Sandra Gamarra, Guzik & Gutierrez, Pablo Helguera, Jesus Negron, Enrique Jezik, Anibal Lopez, Isabel & Jon, Miguel Angel Madrigal, Ives Maes, Ronald Moran, Castillo/Hayashi/O’Connel, Diego Perez, Beatriz Santiago, Yasmin Hage, Miguel Vetura, Tercer un Quinto, Hector Zamora

www.lc060.org/frontera

 

Tourism#20: Paraiso poster
Edition of 5

Lambda-print on acrylic
100 x 120 cm
2007

 

‘Fundraising appeal’, CIAP, Hasselt, Belgium
08/01/05 – 19/02/05

Solo exhibition

www.ciap.be

 

Fundraising appeal box
Edition of 20    

Silk-screen print on cardboard                                     
32 x 23 x 8 cm
2005

 
2004
 

‘Enduring Freedom’, Museo Carillo y Gil, Mexico D.F.
01/12/04 – 27/02/05

Curator: Laboratorio 060

Groupshow with:

Carlos Aguirre, Shepard Farey, César Flores & Gabriella Gomez-Mont, Ruben Gutierrez, Alex Hannimann, Ives Maes, Alfredo Matus, Mauricio Moran, Gianni Motti, Palomo, Jason Archer & Paul Beck, Richard Ross, Santiago Sierra

www.lc060.org

 

SIMON anti-personnel landmines

Resin, hemp, pigment, poppy seeds
(16x) 28 x 9 cm
2004

Ives Maes plays with the ethics of war. His mines propose an artefact for politically correct warfare. Besides it makes an easier transition, cynical as it is, in changing a country from a terrorist status to a liberated and free nation.

(Excerpt from the text ‘Aplican restricciones’ by Javier Toscano published in ‘Libertad Duradera’, Laboratorio 060, 2004)

 

‘Il Giardino Segreto’, FLACc, Genk, Belgium
27/06/04 – 08/08/04

Solo exhibition

www.flacc.info

 

P.O.E. (purity of essence)

Resin, hemp, pigment, wood, fountain, water
90 x 120 x 80 cm
2004

Ives Maes probed the derailment of contemporary hyper-ethics with his project for a recyclable refugee camp. His latrines, wells, shelters and coffins, fabricated in a natural resin, raise ethics to a manic state. The Recyclable Refugee Camp tackles the ethical imperative that encourages art to intervene in the world, localizing the epicenter of a new utopia inside the boundaries of the art world itself.

(Excerpt from the text ‘An economy of truth’ by Wim Peeters, published in Flash Art nr. 235, 2004)

 

‘Localismos’, Mexico D.F. , Mexico
06/06/04 – 30/07/04

Curator: Perros Negros

Groupshow with:

Xavier Andrade,Julieta Aranda, Erick Beltran, Miguel Calderon, Carolina Caycedo, Andrea Crews, Asier Pérez Gonzalez, Miki Guadamur, Philippe Hernandez, Tatsuo Inagaki, Ives Maes, Aleksandra Mir, Tercer un Quinto, Santiago Reyes, Nuevos Ricos (Carlos Amorales), Mara Verna, Anton Vidokle

 

Biodegradable hubcaps

Resin, hemp, pigment
24 x 7 cm
2004

Thousands of Volkswagen taxis drive around Mexico City with a sign that says 'Sin Plombo', or 'Unleaded'. But the taxistas cannot afford the more expensive unleaded fuel so they ironically drive with normal gasoline. I invented yellow biodegradable hubcaps as an ecological ornament for the taxistas to honor them for all their so-called environmental efforts. Five taxis drove with these hubcaps between the locations of the exhibition. A sticker on the door said that it was an environment friendly taxi because it drove with biodegradable hubcaps.

 

‘Recyclable Refugee Camp’, Brigitte Weiss Gallery, Zürich /CH
09/01/04 – 28/02/04

Solo exhibition

Curator: Tom Nys

www.likeyou.com/brigitteweiss

 

Shelter      

Resin, hemp, pigment                                                               
60 x 117 x 185 cm
2004

R.R.C. - built in conformity with the regulations of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees - consists of structures such as living units, a multifunctional tent and latrines; all easily transportable and with a relatively low production cost. Strikingly, Maes did not developed his R.R.C. out of concern with the terrible situation thousands of refugees see themselves in, but out of the artistic need to create an artwork that would be absolutely ethical in nature, well aware of the fact that this claim to hyper-ethicality would fail. Ives Maes began rethinking the ideas of social sculpture and politically engaged art at the instigation of the Progretto Arte manifesto and the concept of Unidee by Pistoletto - R.R.C. was proposed to his Citta dell’ Arte community earlier that year and triggered an intense debate there. Because Maes culminates epistemological tools used in discussions on contemporary art mixed with a set that befits academic discourses on global economy and politics, sociology and ecological concerns. This redundancy makes the work shift to an ideal and utopian construction, though it gleefully retains its perception of pragmatism.

(Excerpt from the text ‘Recyclable Refugee Camp’ by Tom Nys, 2004)

 

Contact me

buro@ivesmaes.com

 

Ives Maes (°1976, Hasselt, Belgium) is a visual artist who lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium. He studied sculpture at the Royal Academy in Ghent, Belgium and a post-graduate program at HISK, Antwerp. In 2008 he was a resident at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin.
In 2004 he started working on the ‘Recyclable Refugee Camp’ project, which is an ironic proposal for a biodegradable living unit. This investigation has recently led to several specific projects and exhibitions. In 2008 the project came to an end with an extensive publication by Mer Paper Kunsthalle.
Currently he is working on a photographic series about World’s Fairs and Science Fiction. For this project Ives Maes is traveling throughout the world to photograph reminisces of World’s Fair buildings.

 
 
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